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Starting ISP 

I do not plan to start my own ISP, but hypothetically if I wanted to in a rural area, how would one do that?

Where do you run fiber from? I understand you can off existing infrastructure?

Just curious how one would do this.
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It was the best of times,

it was the worst of times,

it was the age of wisdom,

it was the age of foolishness,

it was the epoch of belief,

it was the epoch of incredulity,

it was the season of Light,

it was the season of Darkness,

it was the spring of hope,

it was the winter of despair,

we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way-- in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only.

There were a king with a large jaw and a queen with a plain face, on the throne of England; there were a king with a large jaw and a queen with a fair face, on the throne of France. In both countries it was clearer than crystal to the lords of the State preserves of loaves and fishes, that things in general were settled for ever.

It was the year of Our Lord one thousand seven hundred and seventy-five. Spiritual revelations were conceded to England at that favoured period, as at this. Mrs. Southcott had recently attained her five-and-twentieth blessed birthday, of whom a prophetic private in the Life Guards had heralded the sublime appearance by announcing that arrangements were made for the swallowing up of London and Westminster. Even the Cock-lane ghost had been laid only a round dozen of years, after rapping out its messages, as the spirits of this very year last past (supernaturally deficient in originality) rapped out theirs. Mere messages in the earthly order of events had lately come to the English Crown and People, from a congress of British subjects in America: which, strange to relate, have proved more important to the human race than any communications yet received through any of the chickens of the Cock-lane brood.

France, less favoured on the whole as to matters spiritual than her sister of the shield and trident, rolled with exceeding smoothness down hill, making paper money and spending it. Under the guidance of her Christian pastors, she entertained herself, besides, with such humane achievements as sentencing a youth to have his hands cut off, his tongue torn out with pincers, and his body burned alive, because he had not kneeled down in the rain to do honour to a dirty procession of monks which passed within his view, at a distance of some fifty or sixty yards. It is likely enough that, rooted in the woods of France and Norway, there were growing trees, when that sufferer was put to death, already marked by the Woodman, Fate, to come down and be sawn into boards, to make a certain movable framework with a sack and a knife in it, terrible in history. It is likely enough that in the rough outhouses of some tillers of the heavy lands adjacent to Paris, there were sheltered from the weather that very day, rude carts, bespattered with rustic mire, snuffed about by pigs, and roosted in by poultry, which the Farmer, Death, had already set apart to be his tumbrils of the Revolution. But that Woodman and that Farmer, though they work unceasingly, work silently, and no one heard them as they went about with muffled tread: the rather, forasmuch as to entertain any suspicion that they were awake, was to be atheistical and traitorous.

In England, there was scarcely an amount of order and protection to justify much national boasting. Daring burglaries by armed men, and highway robberies, took place in the capital itself every night; families were publicly cautioned not to go out of town without removing their furniture to upholsterers' warehouses for security; the highwayman in the dark was a City tradesman in the light, and, being recognised and challenged by his fellow-tradesman whom he stopped in his character of “the Captain,” gallantly shot him through the head and rode away; the mail was waylaid by seven robbers, and the guard shot three dead, and then got shot dead himself by the other four, “in consequence of the failure of his ammunition:” after which the mail was robbed in peace; that magnificent potentate, the Lord Mayor of London, was made to stand and deliver on Turnham Green, by one highwayman, who despoiled the illustrious creature in sight of all his retinue; prisoners in London gaols fought battles with their turnkeys, and the majesty of the law fired blunderbusses in among them, loaded with rounds of shot and ball; thieves snipped off diamond crosses from the necks of noble lords at Court drawing-rooms; musketeers went into St. Giles's, to search for contraband goods, and the mob fired on the musketeers, and the musketeers fired on the mob, and nobody thought any of these occurrences much out of the common way. In the midst of them, the hangman, ever busy and ever worse than useless, was in constant requisition; now, stringing up long rows of miscellaneous criminals; now, hanging a housebreaker on Saturday who had been taken on Tuesday; now, burning people in the hand at Newgate by the dozen, and now burning pamphlets at the door of Westminster Hall; to-day, taking the life of an atrocious murderer, and to-morrow of a wretched pilferer who had robbed a farmer's boy of sixpence.

All these things, and a thousand like them, came to pass in and close upon the dear old year one thousand seven hundred and seventy-five. Environed by them, while the Woodman and the Farmer worked unheeded, those two of the large jaws, and those other two of the plain and the fair faces, trod with stir enough, and carried their divine rights with a high hand. Thus did the year one thousand seven hundred and seventy-five conduct their Greatnesses, and myriads of small creatures--the creatures of this chronicle among the rest--along the roads that lay before them.

It was the Dover road that lay, on a Friday night late in November, before the first of the persons with whom this history has business. The Dover road lay, as to him, beyond the Dover mail, as it lumbered up Shooter's Hill. He walked up hill in the mire by the side of the mail, as the rest of the passengers did; not because they had the least relish for walking exercise, under the circumstances, but because the hill, and the harness, and the mud, and the mail, were all so heavy, that the horses had three times already come to a stop, besides once drawing the coach across the road, with the mutinous intent of taking it back to Blackheath. Reins and whip and coachman and guard, however, in combination, had read that article of war which forbade a purpose otherwise strongly in favour of the argument, that some brute animals are endued with Reason; and the team had capitulated and returned to their duty.
With drooping heads and tremulous tails, they mashed their way through the thick mud, floundering and stumbling between whiles, as if they were falling to pieces at the larger joints. As often as the driver rested them and brought them to a stand, with a wary “Wo-ho! so-ho-then!” the near leader violently shook his head and everything upon it—like an unusually emphatic horse, denying that the coach could be got up the hill. Whenever the leader made this rattle, the passenger started, as a nervous passenger might, and was disturbed in mind.

There was a steaming mist in all the hollows, and it had roamed in its forlornness up the hill, like an evil spirit, seeking rest and finding none. A clammy and intensely cold mist, it made its slow way through the air in ripples that visibly followed and overspread one another, as the waves of an unwholesome sea might do. It was dense enough to shut out everything from the light of the coach-lamps but these its own workings, and a few yards of road; and the reek of the labouring horses steamed into it, as if they had made it all.

Two other passengers, besides the one, were plodding up the hill by the side of the mail. All three were wrapped to the cheekbones and over the ears, and wore jack-boots. Not one of the three could have said, from anything he saw, what either of the other two was like; and each was hidden under almost as many wrappers from the eyes of the mind, as from the eyes of the body, of his two companions. In those days, travellers were very shy of being confidential on a short notice, for anybody on the road might be a robber or in league with robbers. As to the latter, when every posting-house and ale-house could produce somebody in “the Captain's” pay, ranging from the landlord to the lowest stable non-descript, it was the likeliest thing upon the cards. So the guard of the Dover mail thought to himself, that Friday night in November, one thousand seven hundred and seventy-five, lumbering up Shooter's Hill, as he stood on his own particular perch behind the mail, beating his feet, and keeping an eye and a hand on the arm-chest before him, where a loaded blunderbuss lay at the top of six or eight loaded horse-pistols, deposited on a substratum of cutlass.

The Dover mail was in its usual genial position that the guard suspected the passengers, the passengers suspected one another and the guard, they all suspected everybody else, and the coachman was sure of nothing but the horses; as to which cattle he could with a clear conscience have taken his oath on the two Testaments that they were not fit for the journey.

“Wo-ho!” said the coachman. “So, then! One more pull and you're at the top and be damned to you, for I have had trouble enough to get you to it!—Joe!”

“Halloa!” the guard replied.

“What o'clock do you make it, Joe?”

“Ten minutes, good, past eleven.”

“My blood!” ejaculated the vexed coachman, “and not atop of Shooter's yet! Tst! Yah! Get on with you!”
The emphatic horse, cut short by the whip in a most decided negative, made a decided scramble for it, and the three other horses followed suit. Once more, the Dover mail struggled on, with the jack-boots of its passengers squashing along by its side. They had stopped when the coach stopped, and they kept close company with it.

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What we see when awake is death, what we see asleep is sleep.

- Heraclitus

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Trying to reach out for some #privacy advice. I'm looking to securely share #photos of our family with other family members (not many are that tech savvy).

My initial thoughts were to self host a #pixelfed instance but that might be a bit overkill.
Second, I was thinking about just sharing folders from our #nextcloud but that might not be the most user friendly for the non-tech people.

I doubt I could get everyone on session/signal etc.

Any thoughts? Boosts welcome to reach the right people.

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Fitbit / Google / Alternates 

The good news is I'm physically healthier than I've been since before I had major health trouble 8 years ago.

The bad news is I have used a fitbit and today I got the email that they've been assimilated by Google.

I am actively seeking alternates. Please understand I'm pretty much broke and the Inspire HR I have was $75 USD when I got it as a gift.

Boosts encouraged while I jump into research mode, and thanks in advance.

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Our latest episode is out featuring a hacker's perspective on the Capitol Hill riots, including fascist opsec fails and OSINT work to archive their crimes download.2600.com/mediadownloa (RSS: 2600.com/oth-broadband.xml)

Bon, après c'est bien aussi que la litérature pour ado aborde la question d'une manière ou d'une autre vu que c’est probablement l'une des générations les plus profondément bouleversées par toutes cette histoire et sur laquel je pense que l'impact réel ne pourra pas être mesuré avant longtemps, mais sera probablement très important.

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Sérieux? Même dans la série de roman jeunesse La vie compliquée de Léa Olivier le confinement s'invite avec le tome 17: Confinée

Dépôt légal: août 2020.

L’autrice a vraiment pris la balle au bond sur le coup.

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Hacker Seizes Control of Internet-Enabled Chastity Cages - Futurism futurism.com/the-byte/hacker-i

The cyberpunk future is so freaking odd.

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My friends and I have created a small, welcoming place where we video chat called #CircusInPlace .

The name is because I'm a clown, and I train circus skills there. Over time, it has become so much more.

We do the 'be human' thing there, and despite the geographic limitations we do it together. It keeps people happy, and me sane (or what passes for it).

I'd like to invite you to the weird thing we made on the internet. We'll be there tonight starting at 8pm UTC-6.

meet.jit.si/CircusHomeGym

I just had a teenager at the library desk who had a sticker on her smartphone like those warning on cigarets packs saying "Social media will seriously harms your mental health".

I like it.

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Hello mastodon, question technique :
J'ai l'interface graphique de ma debian qui crashe toutes les deux heures, j'ai trouvé aucune information sur d'où ça pourrait venir dans les logs (syslog, kernel ou Xorg), ou idée de où je pourrais chercher ?

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Pixelfed Labs will be sunset on June 14, 2021.

We learned a lot from Labs experiments and will focus our efforts on mobile apps, improving federation and core feature development.

pixelfed.social/site/kb/labs-d

#pixelfed #pixelfedLabs

Tales: Lady Eleanore’s Mantle parcast.com/tales/

In 18th century Boston, a bewitching woman wraps herself in pride as a doctor scrambles to prevent an outbreak of smallpox.

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LibreTranslate: Open Source Machine Translation 100% Self-hosted. No limites. No ties to propietary services: libretranslate.com/

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hackers.town

A bunch of technomancers in the fediverse. Keep it fairly clean please. This arcology is for all who wash up upon it's digital shore.