@cousinofjah

Somewhere around this area is when the behaviour would become anti-competitive. Apple can't introduce its own trackers and then deliberately throttle or lock out competing trackers.

I'm guessing the technology behind Apple's is different significantly that the Apple trackers will simply perform better using a different of new technology that the other trackers don't have access to. I've heard about ultra wide bluetooth, maybe that's it.

Either way, since starting this thread I've learned that the number of Apple devices that can participate in tracking is much, much more than any market share the existing trackers have.

@ReverendLinc

I'm not against the technology. I agree it's immensely useful. I was complaining about how journos haven't said boo about this before Apple jumped into the market.

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@f0x @c0debabe

Oh...well...that certainly changes things. Yeah, that is a MUCH bigger market than Tile ever had.

@cousinofjah

I'll give you platform ckngr but market share? I dunno... All the other tracker companies support both iOS and Android. So it's not clear to me if the number of apple users who activate this will actually eclipse the number of current Tile/Trackr/Chipolo users across both platforms.

@f0x

I'd be interested in how many customers Tile has VS how many Apple users activate this feature.

Given that Tile has been around for a long time and supports both iOS and Android, it's not inconceivable that Tile has (had) a bigger user base than Apple has phones out there.

@c0debabe

@c0debabe
Me too. Usually only when I travel, to keep track of my luggage and laptop bag.

But honestly, anyone could stick a Tile on me and I'd never know.

Yet when Apple makes the very first attempt to limit stalking, the journos go wild poking holes in it saying "it's not enough".

Maybe not, but where are these complaints about the companies doing exactly zero to prevent it?

@f0x

violence/destruction 

@rosegeranium

It's not a new problem. Tile has been on the market for...what... 5+ years?

And as the market first mover, Tile likely had more users than Apple does because Tile, and the other trackers, support Android.

@f0x@social.pixie.town

The other 3 products I mentioned do exactly the same thing.

I don't think there's any tracker that only works in blue tooth range. That'd be fairly useless. They all talk to other users with the app installed to report the location of "lost" trackers.

How come nobody cares about this with the Trakr, Chipolo, and Tile trackers?

Talk about opportunistic journalism.

=====

Apple knows its tiny new lost-item tracker could empower domestic abuse but doesn’t do enough to stop it.

washingtonpost.com/technology/

@feonixrift

Every 3 years when I pull out my multimeter I think "glad I have this"

@potatofamine

I haven't heard these two things be lumped together before. What's the correlation?

This is a great data point. It illustrates how many of your friends that are like "oh, I don't care about tracking" actually really do when faced with the simple question: "do you want your phone to prevent you from being tracked across the Internet?"

It only makes sense that after all the congressional hearings and lawsuits failed to get Facebook under control, it takes another tech behemoth to take down Facebook.

I am pretty sure the whole reason Google is pushing this FloC thing is as a precursor to introducing the same type of functionality in Android, but leave an escape hatch so Google itself can still track and serve ads. Eventually, non-FLoC tracking will probably be prevented in Android as well and then the web will become a vastly different place.

==========

96% of iPhone users have opted out of app tracking since iOS 14.5 launched

imore.com/96-iphone-users-have

I knew it was bad. But I didn't know it was THIS bad!

Biggest ISPs paid for 8.5 million fake FCC comments opposing net neutrality

ISP-funded astroturfing used millions of real names and faked consent records.

arstechnica.com/tech-policy/20

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hackers.town

A bunch of technomancers in the fediverse. Keep it fairly clean please. This arcology is for all who wash up upon it's digital shore.