@endomain problem is, running your own VPN makes your traffic arguably easier to track - your VPN server is probably specific to you and can easily be traced to you. the important takeaway here, i think, is to do your research and pick VPNs based on overall trustworthiness and track record and not on availability and cost factor.

@bclindner The idea that VPNs offer anonymity is the problem here. If you want anonymity, you need to use a different technology.

This is part of why VPNs are such scams: they blatantly lie to customers about what threat model they service.

@endomain that's a fair point, yeah. that said, anonymity is quickly being made harder and harder to accomplish, so really my only takeaway from this article is "yeah no nothing can save you from big brother now, thanks"

@bclindner You absolutely can do things but you need to be really clear about what you're trying to accomplish and stick to it.

There are actually some pretty wild solutions I've found. For example, I leave jump boxes at coworking spaces. As long as I maintain a membership, it's not illegal. I can use these to relay traffic out of areas where the network is unfriendly. Those boxes also run Tor nodes, so I can immediately obfuscate traffic.

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hackers.town

A bunch of technomancers in the fediverse. Keep it fairly clean please. This arcology is for all who wash up upon it's digital shore.